Ethics 3

The last month or so i’ve been working on things that have often been frustrating.

As i’m not as dynamic as many others, i haven’t found the time or energy to post here.

Although i largely finished the short video series of Ayn Rand’s The Objectivist Ethics (from The Virtue of Selfishness) last month, it took me some time to add mundane final touches and then to arrive at this point.

Continue reading Ethics 3

Delayed Again

Obviously my book didn’t meet the tentative 10 December release date i talked about in my last post.

But it is coming this month.

The book itself is ready to go now, but a few related matters still need to be settled.

Rather than give a specific date this time, i’ll just say it will be ready in time for christmas.

I’ve been in direct touch with Santa, who tells me he’s now vegan, and has coordinated with Amazon to have my book ready for instant delivery before the big day.

Measure of value

Steve Best says that “the only measure of value in capitalism is exchange value, not the intrinsic value of life.”

Exchange value enriches life. It makes travel possible; enables us to buy food at the supermarket; to communicate across the world by email; and even to work at universities decrying capitalism.

As i mentioned in my last post, Ayn Rand tells us in The Objectivist Ethics, that “The principle of trade is the only rational ethical principle for all human relationships, personal and social, private and public, spiritual and material. It is the principle of justice.”

As such, a measure of value in capitalism is certainly exchange value, whether that’s of tyres or tofu.

But is exchange value the only measure?

No. In fact, to arrive at capitalism as a social system, and to arrive at morality before that, there must be an ultimate standard of value. And that ultimate standard of value, contrary to Steve, is life.

Any action that disregards the value of life is not capitalism, but a flawed understanding of it.